American Independent Cinema

FLAD’s first edition of Outsiders – American Independent Cinema aims to highlight independent American films. A co-production between Cinema São Jorge and FLAD, Outsiders features a selection of films by independent directors, produced in the USA between 2006 and 2020, some of which have won awards but have never been screened in Portugal before.
The 14 feature films and 8 short films involve low-cost budgets, digital video recording, or improvised dialogues, offering a different look at the contemporary life of American young adults.

Schedule


Opening night30/11 Tue
21h30
Lena Dunham, 2010, 98'

01/12 Wed
19h00
Robert Greene, 2014, 86'

01/12 Wed
21h30
Eliza Hittman, 2013, 82’

02/12 Thu
21h30
Rick Alverson, 2012, 95'

03/12 Fri
19h00
Khalik Allah, 2015, 60'

03/12 Fri
21h30
Patrick Wang, 2011, 169'

04/12 Sat
19h00
Amy Seimetz, 2012, 90'

Centerpiece04/12 Sat
21h30
Benny Safdie, Josh Safdie, 2006/2020, 99'

05/12 Sun
19h00
Bill Ross IV, Turner Ross, 2012, 80'

05/12 Sun
21h30
John Magary, 2014, 111'

06/12 Mon
21h30
Greta Gerwig, Joe Swanberg, 2008, 80'

07/12 Tue
19h00
Frank V. Ross, 2010, 85'

07/12 Tue
21h30
Joe Swanberg, 2012, 79’

08/12 Wed
19h00
James N. Kienitz Wilkins, 2016, 23'

08/12 Wed
19h00
Peter Parlow, 2019, 76'

Closing night08/12 Wed
21h30
Chloe Zhao, 2017, 104'

From No Budgetto Netflix

Masterclass

DEC 7th, 5 pm

Grande AuditórioFaculdade de Belas-Artes, Universidade de Lisboa

View More
JoeSwanberg

Purchase your ticket

Tickets

Films

TINY FURNITURE
Fiction, 2010, 98’


ACTRESS
Documentary, 2014, 86’


IT FELT LIKE LOVE
Fiction, 2013, 82’


THE COMEDY
Fiction, 2012, 95’


FIELD NIGGAS
Documentary, 2015, 60’


IN THE FAMILY
Fiction, 2011, 169’


SUN DON’T SHINE
Fiction, 2012, 90’


WE’RE GOING TO THE ZOO
Fiction, 2006, 15’


THE BACK OF HER HEAD
Fiction, 2007, 20’


THERE’S NOTHING YOU CAN DO
Fiction, 2008, 4’


THE ACQUAINTANCES OF A LONELY JOHN
Fiction, 2008, 12’


JOHN’S GONE
Fiction, 2010, 22’


THE BLACK BALLOON
Fiction, 2012, 20’


GOLDMAN V. SILVERMAN
Fiction, 2020, 6’


TCHOUPITOULAS
Documentary, 2012, 80’


THE MEND
Fiction, 2014, 111’


NIGHTS AND WEEKENDS
Fiction, 2008, 80’


AUDREY THE TRAINWRECK
Fiction, 2010, 85’


ALL THE LIGHT IN THE SKY
Fiction, 2012, 79’


INDEFINITE PITCH
Experimental, 2016, 23’


THE PLAGIARISTS
Fiction, 2019, 76’


THE RIDER
Fiction, 2017, 104’


"The outsiders are here, ready to conquer their place, which has been owed to them for a long time now."

By Carlos Nogueira, Programmer

At first glance, an independent film would be the opposite of a Hollywood film. To put it simply, while the latter involves huge budgets, the former costs relatively little; one is essentially entertainment, the other seeks to challenge the spectator; one avoids taking sides in politically sensitive matters, the other is often explicitly critical; one resorts to stereotypical formulas, the other seeks to transmit a personalized point of view. In other words, an independent filmmaker would be, by choice, an outsider (as opposed to a Hollywood insider), in order to maintain creative freedom.

In reality, things are much more complicated…What about the great Hollywood directors, past and present, who were able to transmit their world view in spite of the industrial machine, or even because of it? Or independent filmmakers who challenged the indie format, or those who didn´t resist the call of the studios?

The independent production system can provide those with the wherewithal to take advantage of them, with greater guarantees for making a personal film without needing to make concessions, and for maintaining control of their work, whether in the production phase or the distribution and exhibition phases.

The task is not necessarily easy, and requires an enormous dose of perseverance, but the truth is, that we have rarely seen such a large proliferation of creativity in the field of independent film, once an excessively thankless job, as we do today.

The history of independent film in the United States is almost as old as film itself. In fact, even though today “independent film” is practically defined as the antithesis of Hollywood, few are aware that Hollywood was born as a rebellion of the “independents” against the Motion Picture Patents Company, or the “Edison Trust”, which held the patents to the raw material. However, in a little over a decade, the companies which had moved to the West coast in order to dedicate themselves to production far from the purview of the MPPC, had cobbled together their own production, distribution and exhibition system, which would go down in history as “the studio system”, and which would replace the Edison monopoly with the Hollywood oligopoly.

The studio system and its complicated, but extremely controlled, structure dominated the American film industry for more than three decades, leaving little or no space for independent production.

However, beginning in the 50s, following the famous anti-trust legal decision, which forced studios to abandon the showing of films, the door was opened to the arrival of independent production. In the 60s, the first, more or less informal, “movements” or groups of films considered alternatives to “commercial films” appeared. John Cassavetes, on the one hand, and Roger Corman on the other, were some of the figures which fostered American independent film during that time.

Modern American independent film has been around since about the mid-80s, in large part thanks to the trend imprinted by the Sundance Festival, and it arose with an explicit intention to rebel against the dominant film model.

As the directors of this first indie wave, closely connected to the cultural fringes of New York, went down diverging paths, including Hollywood (the Coen brothers and Steven Soderbergh), various fringe circuits (John Waters and Sara Driver), and the cinematic essay (Mark Rappaport), a wave of “artisan” film was taking shape: Richard Linklater, Alexander Rockwell, Wes Anderson. It was the beginning of the 90s, and new creative hubs appeared (Austin, Boston), as well as new festivals, which served as launching pads.

At the turn of the millennium, advances in technology played a substantial role in the resurgence of independent film. The availability of digital cameras at accessible prices ushered in a true cultural revolution: for the first time in its history, the Seventh Art was within reach of any average grant, and had a truly competitive quality; it was possible to make a feature-length film in your backyard, with friends or fellow students, for very little money. And even better than that, the Internet would open up a completely new distribution circuit for these works.

Therefore, the third indie wave, during the 2000s, grabbed these new opportunities eagerly, enthusiastically and creatively. It maintains a large part of the traits that characterized their elders (though it adds its own — narratives around post-graduate young adult anxiety, using non-professional actors and an almost always improvised dialogue), yet often revises itself as the heir to the do legacy, and embodies a variety which resists, as did the previous ones, being classified as a “movement”.

This artistic diversity had a very notable corresponding diversity of reception. While it is true that many filmmakers, whether identified by the label “mumblecore” or not, achieved a certain notoriety within indie circuits, many others were not so lucky, even in the United States.

In Portugal, alternative programming did not pay it any particular attention; it was almost always limited to following certain international trends. It´s true that Andrew Bujalski and the Safdie brothers were regularly shown, but many other important names from this indie wave escaped the programming radar. Lena Dunham owes her reputation here to the series Girls: none of the films she directed were shown in Portugal. Only one film by Joe Swanberg, one of the biggest names in mumblecore, and one of the most prolific contemporary filmmakers (19 feature films in less than 15 years), was ever shown. The first features by Greta Gerwig, Eliza Hittman, Amy Seimetz and Khalik Allah never had a national premiere. It took an Oscar for us to hear of Chloe Zhao.

Important filmmakers such as Frank V. Ross, Patrick Wang and Bill and Turner Ross are completely unknown. A large part of Rick Alverson and Robert Greene´s works remain invisible. Even the Safdie have an almost hidden facet…

Therefore, a great part of the work of disseminating this generation of independent films remains undone. Showing this group of films in Portugal for the first time, will enable us to fill in the gaps, build bridges and find lost connections. The outsiders are here, ready to conquer their place, which has been owed to them for a long time now.

Useful Information

Cinema São Jorge
Avenida da Liberdade, nº175
1250-141 Lisbon

Tickets
4,50 €
Without discounts
Purchase your ticket here

How to get there?

Metro
Blue Line | Station: Avenida

Bus 
709, 711, 732, 736

Contacts

Press: Helena César – helenacesar@speak.pt

Other informations: media.cultura@flad.pt

SessIONS FOR M/14

  • Films subtitled in Portuguese
  • Program subject to changes
  • No reserved seats
  • The use of a mask is mandatory inside the cinema
  • Cinema São Jorge operates in accordance with the recommendations of the Directorate-General of Health

Credits

Programmer

Carlos Nogueira

Production Coordination

Vítor Alves Brotas | Agency 25

Production

Clélia Luiz, Filipa da Rocha Nunes, Rui Vallêra

Communication Coordination

Inês Lampreia, Liliana Valpaços

Communication

Inês Braizinha, Mariana Nunes, Nuno Martins

Press

Helena César

Graphic Identity

atelier-do-ver

Comunication Design, Web Design and Video

WSA Creative Agency

Translation

Elsa Vieira

Photography

Joanna Linda

Acknowledgments

António Pinto Ribeiro

CINEMA SÃO JORGE

 

Director

Marina Sousa Uva

Deputy Director

Inês Freire

Technical coordination

Fernando Caldeira

Deputy technical coordination

Diogo Viana

Projectionists

Carlos Souto

Jorge Silva

Show technicians

Carlos Rocha

Pedro Moreira

Communication

Francisco Barbosa

Pedro Vieira

Home Front Coordination

Diana Liberal Guedes

Administrative Technician

Catarina Bernardo

Ticket Technicians

Carina Rodrigues

Carolina Liberal

Mariana Guimarães

Soraia Souto

Maintenance

Mário Silva

Programmer

Carlos Nogueira

Production Coordination

Vítor Alves Brotas | Agency 25

Production

Clélia Luiz, Filipa da Rocha Nunes, Rui Vallêra

Communication Coordination

Inês Lampreia, Liliana Valpaços

Communication

Inês Braizinha, Mariana Nunes, Nuno Martins

Press

Helena César

Graphic Identity

atelier-do-ver

Comunication Design, Web Design and Video

WSA Creative Agency

Translation

Elsa Vieira

Photography

Joanna Linda

Acknowledgments

António Pinto Ribeiro

CINEMA SÃO JORGE

 

Director

Marina Sousa Uva

Deputy Director

Inês Freire

Technical coordination

Fernando Caldeira

Deputy technical coordination

Diogo Viana

Projectionists

Carlos Souto

Jorge Silva

Show technicians

Carlos Rocha

Pedro Moreira

Communication

Francisco Barbosa

Pedro Vieira

Home Front Coordination

Diana Liberal Guedes

Administrative Technician

Catarina Bernardo

Ticket Technicians

Carina Rodrigues

Carolina Liberal

Mariana Guimarães

Soraia Souto

Maintenance

Mário Silva

A coproduction

Sponsorship

Media Partners

Support for Disclosure